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2020 MIPS Measure #293: Parkinson’s Disease: Rehabilitative Therapy Options

Quality ID 293
High Priority Measure Yes
Specifications Registry
Measure Type Process
Specialty Neurology

Measure Description

Percentage of all patients with a diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease (or caregiver(s), as appropriate) who had rehabilitative therapy options (i.e., physical, occupational, and speech therapy) discussed in the past 12 months

 

Instructions

This measure is to be submitted a minimum of once per performance period for patients with a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease seen during the performance period. This measure may be submitted by Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) eligible clinicians who perform the quality actions described in the measure based on the services provided and the measure-specific denominator coding.

Measure Submission Type:

Measure data may be submitted by individual MIPS eligible clinicians, groups, or third party intermediaries. The listed denominator criteria are used to identify the intended patient population. The numerator options included in this specification are used to submit the quality actions as allowed by the measure. The quality-data codes listed do not need to be submitted by MIPS eligible clinicians, groups, or third party intermediaries that utilize this modality for submissions; however, these codes may be submitted for those third party intermediaries that utilize Medicare Part B claims data. For more information regarding Application Programming Interface (API), please refer to the Quality Payment Program (QPP) website.

 

Denominator

All patients with a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease

DENOMINATOR NOTE: *Signifies that this CPT Category I code is a non-covered service under the Medicare Part B Physician Fee Schedule (PFS). These non-covered services should be counted in the denominator population for MIPS CQMs.

Denominator Criteria (Eligible Cases):

All patients regardless of age

AND

Diagnosis for Parkinson’s disease (ICD-10-CM): G20

AND

Patient encounter during the performance period (CPT): 99201, 99202, 99203, 99204, 99205, 99211, 99212, 99213, 99214, 99215, 99241*, 99242*, 99243*, 99244*, 99245*, 99304, 99305, 99306, 99307, 99308, 99309, 99310

WITHOUT

Telehealth Modifier: GQ, GT, 95, POS 02

 

Numerator

All patients with a diagnosis of Parkinson’s Disease (or caregiver(s), as appropriate) who had rehabilitative therapy options (i.e., physical, occupational, and speech therapy) discussed in the past 12 months

NUMERATOR NOTE: The 12 month look back period is defined as 12 months from the date of the denominator eligible encounter. Denominator Exception(s) are determined on the date of the denominator eligible encounter.

Numerator Options:

Performance Met: Rehabilitative therapy options discussed with patient (or caregiver) (4400F)

OR

Denominator Exception: Documentation of medical reason(s) for not discussing rehabilitative therapy options with patient (or caregiver) (4400F with 1P)

OR

Performance Not Met: Rehabilitative therapy options not discussed with patient (or caregiver), reason not otherwise specified (4400F with 8P)

 

Rationale

For those patients with Parkinson’s disease who have impaired activities of daily living, therapy options such as physical, occupational, and speech therapy should be offered. Rehabilitative therapies play an important role in improving function and quality of life for these patients. Symptomatic therapy can provide benefit for many years. Patients with Parkinson’s disease commonly develop dysarthria.

AAN QSS Neuro Alt (April 2006) Suchowersky O, Gronseth G, Perlmutter J, Reich S, Zesiewicz T, Weiner

WJ, Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Practice parameter: neuroprotective strategies and alternative therapies for Parkinson disease (an evidence-based review): report of the Quality Standards Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology. Neurology 2006 Apr 11; 66(7):976-82.

Factor, S. Weiner, W. Parkinson’s disease: Diagnosis and Clinical Management. 2002

 

Clinical Recommendation Statements

  • Physiotherapy should be available for people with PD. Particular consideration should be given to:
  1. gait re-education, improvement of balance and flexibility; enhancement of aerobic capacity; improvement of movement initiation; improvement of functional independence, including mobility and activities of daily living;
  2. provision of advice regarding safety in the home environment. (Level B)(1)
  • Occupational therapy should be available for people with PD. Particular consideration should be given to:
  1. maintenance of work and family roles, home care and leisure activities; improvement and maintenance of transfers and mobility; improvement of personal self-care activities, such as eating, drinking, washing, and dressing; cognitive assessment and appropriate intervention. (Level D)(1)
  • Speech and language therapy should be available for people with PD. Particular consideration should be given to: -Improvement of vocal loudness and pitch range, including speech therapy programs such as Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT) (Level B)(1)
  • For patients with Parkinson’s disease complicated by dysarthria, speech therapy may be considered to improve speech volume (Level C). Different exercise modalities, including multidisciplinary rehabilitation, active music therapy, treadmill training, balance training, and "cued" exercise training are probably effective in improving functional outcomes for patients with Parkinson’s disease. For patients with Parkinson’s disease, exercise therapy may be considered to improve function (Level C). (2)
  • The results of this systematic review have suggested that progressive resistance exercise can be effective and worthwhile in people with mild to moderate Parkinson’s disease, but carryover of these benefits may not occur in all measures of physical performance. We recommend that progressive resistance exercise should be implemented into clinical practice as a therapy for Parkinson’s disease, particularly when the aim is improving walking capacity in such people. (3)

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