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2020 MIPS Measure #397: Melanoma Reporting

Quality ID

397

High Priority Measure

Yes

Specifications

Registry

Measure Type

Process

Specialty

Pathology

Measure Description

Pathology reports for primary malignant cutaneous melanoma that include the pT category and a statement on thickness, ulceration and mitotic rate

 

Instructions

This measure is to be submitted each time a patient’s pathology report addresses specimens with a diagnosis of malignant cutaneous melanoma; however, only one quality-data code (QDC) per date of service for a patient is required. This measure may be submitted by Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) eligible clinicians who perform the quality actions described in the measure based on the services provided and the measure-specific denominator coding.

Measure Submission Type:

Measure data may be submitted by individual MIPS eligible clinicians, groups, or third party intermediaries. The listed denominator criteria are used to identify the intended patient population. The numerator options included in this specification are used to submit the quality actions as allowed by the measure. The quality-data codes listed do not need to be submitted by MIPS eligible clinicians, groups, or third party intermediaries that utilize this modality for submissions; however, these codes may be submitted for those third party intermediaries that utilize Medicare Part B claims data. For more information regarding Application Programming Interface (API), please refer to the Quality Payment Program (QPP) website.

 

Denominator

All melanoma pathology reports for primary malignant cutaneous melanoma

Denominator Instruction:

The intent of the measure is to only include pathology reports for primary malignant cutaneous melanoma that may be staged with the following components: pT category and a statement on thickness, ulceration and mitotic rate. Melanoma in situ cases do not meet the criteria for this denominator. In the instance a pathology report meets the denominator criteria, but represents a diagnosis of Melanoma in situ G9430 should be utilized.

Denominator Criteria (Eligible Cases):

Patients ≥ 18 years of age on date of encounter

AND

Diagnosis for malignant cutaneous melanoma (ICD-10-CM): C43.0, C43.20, C43.21, C43.22, C43.30, C43.31, C43.39, C43.4, C43.51, C43.52, C43.59, C43.60, C43.61, C43.62, C43.70, C43.71, C43.72, C43.8, C43.9

AND

Patient encounter during performance period (CPT): 88305

AND NOT

DENOMINATOR EXCLUSION:

Specimen site other than anatomic cutaneous location: G9430

 

Numerator

Pathology reports for primary malignant cutaneous melanoma that include the pT category and a statement on thickness, ulceration and mitotic rate

Numerator Options:

Performance Met: Pathology report includes the pT Category and a statement on thickness, ulceration and mitotic rate (G9428)

OR

Denominator Exception: Documentation of medical reason(s) for not including pT Category and a statement on thickness, ulceration and mitotic rate (e.g., negative skin biopsies in a patient with a history of melanoma or other documented medical reasons) (G9429)

OR

Performance Not Met: Pathology report does not include the pT Category and a statement on thickness, ulceration and mitotic rate (G9431)

 

Rationale

Research and the publication of new guidelines in 2017 indicate newer tumor characteristics for more precise staging, with implications for treatment outcomes. In 2017, the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Melanoma Expert Panel introduced several important changes to the Tumor, Nodes, Metastasis (TNM) classification. The relevant change for this measure in the eighth edition AJCC Cancer Staging Manual include: 1) tumor thickness measurements to be recorded to the nearest 0.1 mm, not 0.01 mm; 2) definitions of T1a and T1b are revised (T1a, <0.8 mm without ulceration; T1b, 0.8-1.0 mm with or without ulceration or <0.8 mm with ulceration), with mitotic rate no longer a T category criterion. (Gershenwald et al.)

The new guidelines state: “As supported by this univariate analysis and previous reports, the mitotic rate is likely an important prognostic determinant when evaluated using its dynamic range across melanomas of all tumor thickness categories. Therefore, the AJCC Melanoma Expert Panel strongly recommends that mitotic rate be assessed and recorded for all primary melanomas, although it is not used for T1 staging in the eighth edition. The mitotic rate will likely be an important parameter for inclusion in the future development of prognostic models applicable to individual patients. Although it is not included in the T1 subcategory criteria, mitotic activity in T1 melanomas also has been associated with an increased risk of SLN metastasis.” (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.3322/caac.21409/pdf )

The 2020 measure has been revised to conform with AJCC requirements and College of American Pathologists (CAP) Cancer Protocol recommendations that went into effect January 1, 2018.

Gershenwald, J. E., Scolyer, R. A., Hess, K. R., Sondak, V. K., Long, G. V., Ross, M. I., Lazar, A. J., Faries, M. B., Kirkwood, J. M., McArthur, G. A., Haydu, L. E., Eggermont, A. M. M., Flaherty, K. T., Balch, C. M., Thompson, J. F. and for members of the American Joint Committee on Cancer Melanoma Expert Panel and the International Melanoma Database and Discovery Platform (2017), Melanoma staging: Evidence-based changes in the American Joint Committee on Cancer eighth edition cancer staging manual. CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, 67: 472–492 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.3322/caac.21409/full

Protocol for the Examination of Specimens From Patients With Melanoma of the Skin


Clinical Recommendation Statements

In patients with localized melanoma (Stage I or II), Breslow tumor thickness and ulceration continue to be the most important characteristics of the primary tumor predicting outcome.

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