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2020 MIPS Measure #412: Documentation of Signed Opioid Treatment Agreement

Quality ID 412
High Priority Measure Yes
Specifications Registry
Measure Type Process
Specialty Family Medicine Geriatrics Internal Medicine Neurology Orthopedic Surgery Physical Medicine

Measure Description

All patients 18 and older prescribed opiates for longer than six weeks duration who signed an opioid treatment agreement at least once during Opioid Therapy documented in the medical record

 

Instructions

This measure is to be submitted a minimum of once per performance period for all patients being prescribed opioids for duration longer than six weeks during the performance period. There is no diagnosis associated with this measure. This measure may be submitted by Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) eligible clinicians who perform the quality actions described in the measure based on the services provided and the measure-specific denominator coding.

Measure Submission Type:

Measure data may be submitted by individual MIPS eligible clinicians, groups, or third party intermediaries. The listed denominator criteria are used to identify the intended patient population. The numerator options included in this specification are used to submit the quality actions as allowed by the measure. The quality-data codes listed do not need to be submitted by MIPS eligible clinicians, groups, or third party intermediaries that utilize this modality for submissions; however, these codes may be submitted for those third party intermediaries that utilize Medicare Part B claims data. For more information regarding Application Programming Interface (API), please refer to the Quality Payment Program (QPP) website.

 

Denominator

All patients 18 and older prescribed opiates for longer than six weeks duration

Denominator Criteria (Eligible Cases):

Patients aged ≥ 18 years on date of encounter

AND

Patient encounter during the performance period (CPT): 99201, 99202, 99203, 99204, 99205, 99212,99213, 99214, 99215, 99304, 99305, 99306, 99307, 99308, 99309, 99310, 99324, 99325, 99326, 99327, 99328, 99334, 99335, 99336, 99337, 99341, 99342, 99343, 99344, 99345, 99347, 99348, 99349, 99350

WITHOUT

Telehealth Modifier: GQ, GT, 95, POS 02

AND

Patients prescribed opiates for longer than six weeks: G9577

AND NOT

DENOMINATOR EXCLUSION:

Patients who were in hospice at any time during the performance period: M1022, M1025, or M1026

 

Numerator

Patients who signed an opioid treatment agreement at least once during opioid therapy

Definition:

Opioid Treatment Agreement – a treatment agreement is a signed document between MIPS eligible clinician and patient prior to initiating Continuous Opioid Therapy (COT). This agreement should include:

• Potential Risks of COT
• Alternatives to COT

Numerator Options:

Performance Met: Documentation of signed opioid treatment agreement at least once during opioid therapy (G9578)

OR

Performance Not Met: No documentation of signed opioid treatment agreement at least once during opioid therapy (G9579)

 

Rationale

The goal of the consent process is to assist patients to make appropriate medical decisions that are consistent with their preferences and values. In some states, clinicians are required to document this discussion, though specific requirements vary.


Clinical Recommendation Statements

When starting COT, informed consent should be obtained. A continuing discussion with the patient regarding COT should include goals, expectations, potential risks, and alternatives to COT (strong recommendation, low-quality evidence).

Clinicians may consider using a written COT management plan to document patient and clinician responsibilities and expectations and assist in patient education (weak recommendation, low-quality evidence) (p. 116).

Chou R, Fanciullo GJ, Fine PG, et al. Clinical Guidelines for the Use of Chronic Opioid Therapy in Chronic Noncancer Pain. J Pain 2009; 10(2):113-130.

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